Small-Grain “Giniling”

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TEFF (OR SMALL GRAIN) ‘GINILING’ If you wander into specialty health stores and find this unusual grain on sale and wonder what you can do with it, then this recipe will help. Teff is an ancient grain from Ethiopia and a staple in their cuisines. I learned that it is high in protein and carbohydrates and is a good source of calcium and iron. For this recipe, substitutes I have tried are couscous, millet, and quinoa. I would think bulgur is also a good substitute. While the recipe calls for an oven, I have tried this on a stove top, too, but just make sure your kidney beans are super dry. You can shape as patties and serve this in a bun with all your favorite fixings. You can also freeze and crumble to make a taco filling, add in sauces like Bolognese. Cook with diced potatoes, diced carrots, and raisins the way you would cook giniling (which reminds me of UP Engineering giniling back in the day) and serve with rice. (Karla) 2/3 cup teff 2 c water 1 to 2 tbsps olive oil 1 c onion, minced 1 c mushroom, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 medium carrot, grated 1 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp black pepper 1 1/2 c cooked kidney beans or 1 can of 439 g drained and rinsed 1/4 c nutritional yeast Instructions: 1. Put the 2 c of water in a saucepan. Once it boils, stir in the teff and reduce to a simmer. Cover and cook 15 to 20 minutes until the teff is cooked. 2. Meanwhile heat the oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Once hot, add the onion and sauté until translucent. Stir in the mushrooms, carrots, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook without cover until the sauté mixture is dry. 3. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 4. In a mixing bowl, mash with the drained beans with a potato masher until all of the beans are broken up. Add in the cooked teff and mash it in with the potato masher into the beans. Mix in the sautéed veggies and nutritional yeast. 5. Coat a large sheet pan with oil. Spread the giniling mixture and flatten. Divide into sections so you can flip them on one side. 6. Cook 20 to 25 minutes or until they are solid enough to easily flip. Then flip and cook on the other side until edges are crispy, about 10 to 15 minutes more. #vegan #plantbased #whatveganseat

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Creamy White Bean, Patola and Miso Soup

by Me & My Veg Mouth

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Creamy White Bean, Patola, and Miso Soup Serves 8 to 10 as side, 4 to 6 as main Here’s a creamy way to enjoy miso as the weather becomes cooler. This was a hit in our miso making class, and we used an 8-month-old chickpea miso. The miso takes the place of salt in this recipe. If you don’t have miso, just season with salt to taste. 2 c dried white beans, soaked overnight, drained, rinsed, and sprouted over 2 to 3 days 3 medium onions, diced 1/4 c nutritional yeast 3 bay leaves 2 c squash, diced 2 patola, sliced into thin discs water salt neutral oil miso paste 1. Rinse sprouted beans under running water. Soaking and sprouting cut the bean cooking time by third and boosts the nutritional benefits. 2. In a large lidded pot over medium heat, cook the sprouted beans in water. Make sure the water covers the beans by about an inch or so. Cook the beans until you can easily mash them with a fork. Set aside. 3. In another pot, sweat the onions in oil over low heat for at least 15 minutes, seasoning with a bit of salt. 4. Increase heat to medium and add nutritional yeast and bay leaves. Toss for about 5 minutes. 5. Add the squash, beans, and bean cooking liquid into the pot. Cook until the squash is fork tender. The beans will break down during this process, but you can opt to blend about 2 cups of the soup for extra creaminess. (See note below.) 6. Add patola slices and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves when serving. 7. Serve in bowls with miso paste on the side. This soup also freezes well. Note: To use a blender for the hot soup, make sure that the blender lid has vents to let the steam escape. If your blender does not have air vents, just hold a clean dish towel over the blender. DO NOT BLEND WITH AN AIRTIGHT LID. #vegan #whatveganseat #veganfoodshare #vegansofig #plantbased #plantstrong #plantpowered #plantpushers #miso #lifeforcenutrition

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Serves 8 to 10 as side, 4 to 6 as main

Here’s a creamy way to enjoy miso as the weather becomes cooler. This was a hit in our miso making class, and we used an 8-month-old chickpea miso. The miso takes the place of salt in this recipe. If you don’t have miso, just season with salt to taste.
2 c dried white beans, soaked overnight, drained, rinsed, and sprouted over 2 to 3 days
3 medium onions, diced
1/4 c nutritional yeast
3 bay leaves
2 c squash, diced
2 patola, sliced into thin discs
water
salt
neutral oil
miso paste

1. Rinse sprouted beans under running water. Soaking and sprouting cut the bean cooking time by third and boosts the nutritional benefits.
2. In a large lidded pot over medium heat, cook the sprouted beans in water. Make sure the water covers the beans by about an inch or so. Cook the beans until you can easily mash them with a fork. Set aside.
3. In another pot, sweat the onions in oil over low heat for at least 15 minutes, seasoning with a bit of salt.
4. Increase heat to medium and add nutritional yeast and bay leaves. Toss for about 5 minutes.
5. Add the squash, beans, and bean cooking liquid into the pot. Cook until the squash is fork tender. The beans will break down during this process, but you can opt to blend about 2 cups of the soup for extra creaminess. (See note below.)
6. Add patola slices and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves when serving.
7. Serve in bowls with miso paste on the side. This soup also freezes well.
Note: To use a blender for the hot soup, make sure that the blender lid has vents to let the steam escape. If your blender does not have air vents, just hold a clean dish towel over the blender. DO NOT BLEND WITH AN AIRTIGHT LID.