Lumpia Two-Ways

Looking at these photos, I feel as though I must demand a taste tax for writing an introduction. How can I introduce a recipe (nay, two!) that I have never tasted? It is unthinkable, inauthentic, oppressive, manipulative…
So you can use most seasonal vegetables you get in your tampipi; the secret is the… wait for it…DIVERSITY of the vegetables you get! And yummz spicy vinegar for the fried one!

Fresh or fried.

Two types of filling. You can experiment with any vegetables! Sayote turon!

Yield 10 servings

Ingredients

  • 10 pcs lumpia wrapper

Filling 1:

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 stalks onion leeks, chopped coarsely
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup carrots, grated
  • 3/4 cup red radish, grated
  • 1/4 kg kamote tops, chopped coarsely
  • 1/4 kg mustard leaves, chopped coarsely
  • To taste salt
  • To taste pepper

Filling 2:

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 stalks onion leeks, chopped coarsely
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup carrots, grated
  • 1 cup Korean radish, grated
  • 1/4 kg wombok, chopped coarsely
  • 1 pc kamote, boiled and chopped coarsely
  • To taste salt
  • To taste pepper

Procedure

  1. Heat oil in a pan. Saute leeks and garlic until aromatic.
  2. Add carrots and radish, cook for about 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in kamote tops and mustard leaves (Filling 1) / wombok, cook until slightly wilted, add the kamote (Filling 2).
  4. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Let the filling cool before using.
  6. To assemble the lumpia, lay a piece of wrapper on a flat surface. Place 2 tbsp of the filling in the middle. Gently pull up the bottom of the wrapper and roll over the filling, tucking the sides to secure. Seal the roll by adding a bit of water to the edges.
  7. Serve it fresh or fried.

Seasonal Vegetables with Rice Noodles

I have come to believe that with a jar of gochujang you can do anything. Ate Celia seems to agree. And we do know that what Ate Celia says is Truth with a capital T. This family lunch was memorable because of the no-nonsense way that Ate Celia shoveled the rest of this dish unto her plate.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 stalk onion leek, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ginger, julienned 
  • 2 pcs Korean radish, peeled and sliced in batons
  • 1 pc carrot, peeled and sliced in batons
  • 1 pc zucchini, sliced in batons
  • 1 pc patola, diced
  • 200 g rice noodles, pre-cooked
  • 1 tbsp gochujang 
  • 1 bunch sayote tops, chopped in 1/2” sticks
  • Handful of spinach, coarsely chopped
  • To taste coconut aminos
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp sesame seeds, toasted 

Procedure

  1. Heat oil an a deep pan and sauté the aromatics: leeks, ginger.
  2. Add radish, carrots, zucchini and patola. Sauté until slightly cooked.
  3. Add the noodles and gochujang, stir until noodles are coated with gochujang. 
  4. Add sayote tops and cook for 1 minute. 
  5. Add spinach and give a quick stir until spinach is just slightly wilted. 
  6. Season with aminos and sesame oil. Garnish with sesame seeds.

Okra Stew

This was our team lunch last Dec 3, 2019. It was so good we forgot to take a photo! As the Amihan brings its cooling winds, it was the perfect warming family meal made with whatever our farmers shared 🙂

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 stalk onion leek, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pcs eggplant, diced
  • 1 pc zucchini, diced
  • 250 g okra, sliced into 1” rounds
  • 2 pcs chipotle peppers (optional)
  • 1 cup tomato sauce (homemade tomato sauce from our cherry tomatoes – recipe below)
  • To taste salt
  • To taste pepper
  • 2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, minced

Procedure

  1. Heat oil an a pot and sauté the aromatics: leeks, garlic.
  2. Add eggplant, cook until edges are caramelised.
  3. Mix in zucchini, okra and chipotle peppers if using. Give a quick stir before adding the tomato sauce. Simmer until vegetables are tender but still al dente. Top with parsley. 
  4. Great with crusty bread!

Homemade Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 stalk onion leek, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup ripe tomatoes / cherry tomatoes
  • 1/4 c vegetable stock
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp basil
  • To taste salt
  • To taste pepper

Procedure

  1. Heat oil an a pot and sauté the aromatics: leeks, garlic.
  2. Add tomatoes and cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Pour the vegetable stock, bring to boil and turn down to a simmer for 15 minutes. 
  4. Add the herbs and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Puree the mixture using a hand blender.
  6. Keep in the freezer if not using right away.

5-Minute warming Mirepoix

French cooking always uses a flavor base of carrots, celery and onions. What is our local flavor base? Jjoyce uses turmeric, leeks and ginger and shows us a simple everyday way we can harness the natural sweetness and texture of the vegetables. Enjoy!

Today’s lunch from some of yesterday’s farmshare.

Saute leeks, ginger and turmeric until aromatic. Add tomatoes, sayote stalks (reserve leaves for later), chili (optional) sauté until pan is slightly caramelized. Deglaze with water or stock of preference (veg, chicken, etc). Bring to a boil then reduce to simmer. Season with salt or aminos. Add sayote leaves, wombok, cooking until slightly wilted. Drizzle with sesame oil.

Better if you sauté garlic and celery along with the other aromatics for more depth of flavor, but I didn’t have any. Great also with noodles (egg or rice), like in a hot pot restaurant!

Organic Vegetable Stock

Why is buying organic worthwhile? Not only do you pay for the respect towards soil and people, BUT YOU CAN ALSO USE THE WHOLE VEGETABLE! Stems, peels, roots and skins of plants actually have a lot of flavor and nutrients but they may be too tough (and not too pleasant) to chew. The BEST thing to do is turn it into freezable vegetable stock. And this is something you’d only really want to do with pesticide-free produce since these parts tend to absorb whatever nutrients or chemicals that surround the plant in growth. Clean air, water, rich soils and a lot of love create nutritious vegetables. That’s what builds flavor.

Ingredients

  • Vegetable scraps – in this case we used stems/peels of carrot, leek, radish, broccoli (tough parts) and parsley that has seen better days
  • Water

Procedure

  1. Place all vegetable scraps in a large pot and cover with water.
  2. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for 1 hour.
  3. Strain and reserve the scraps for your compost pile!
  4. Store in batches. Freeze if not using right away.

Sweet Potato and Leeks Nuggets

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Sweet Potato and Leeks Nuggets Yield: 10-12 nuggets The humble kamote is one of the healthiest foods around. It’s also among the best, most affordable, and accessible sources of Vit. A. There is however this push for the widespread fortification of our foods, thus promoting greater consumption of highly processed items like instant noodles, bread, margarine, which is exasperatingly counterintuitive when the more robust whole-food sources of nutrients are easily available. Like kamote. One of the most outrageous biofortified foods is Golden Rice. One would need to consume a kilo of it daily to meet the Vit. A RDA (see link below) that kamote meets without lifting a finger. Golden Rice will be marketed as Healthier Rice, which is really quite a misnomer—at 1 kg of rice daily, healthy is the last thing you’d be. Here is an easy snack or ulam recipe that uses our omnipresent kamote. Feel free to use other mild leafies in lieu of cabbage, or even zucchini, which I also tried (second photo c/o @nettypwety). You can also add spices. This nugget recipe is a great template for different veggies, promoting biodiversity, not biofortification, in our diets. (Mabi) 2 medium sweet potatoes, steamed and peeled 1 T chia seeds or flax meal (optional, as binder) 4 leeks, sliced thinly 1 c shredded cabbage 2 tsp sea salt 1/2 tsp paprika 2 T unbleached white flour neutral oil water Got the ingredients? Link in bio for the recipe! Gorgeous gulay from @goodfoodcommunity . . . #vegan #whatveganseat #veganfoodshare #vegansofig #stopgoldenrice #biodiversity #notogmo #foodfarmingfreedom #plantbased #dietforclimate

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