Creamy White Bean, Patola and Miso Soup

by Me & My Veg Mouth

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Creamy White Bean, Patola, and Miso Soup Serves 8 to 10 as side, 4 to 6 as main Here’s a creamy way to enjoy miso as the weather becomes cooler. This was a hit in our miso making class, and we used an 8-month-old chickpea miso. The miso takes the place of salt in this recipe. If you don’t have miso, just season with salt to taste. 2 c dried white beans, soaked overnight, drained, rinsed, and sprouted over 2 to 3 days 3 medium onions, diced 1/4 c nutritional yeast 3 bay leaves 2 c squash, diced 2 patola, sliced into thin discs water salt neutral oil miso paste 1. Rinse sprouted beans under running water. Soaking and sprouting cut the bean cooking time by third and boosts the nutritional benefits. 2. In a large lidded pot over medium heat, cook the sprouted beans in water. Make sure the water covers the beans by about an inch or so. Cook the beans until you can easily mash them with a fork. Set aside. 3. In another pot, sweat the onions in oil over low heat for at least 15 minutes, seasoning with a bit of salt. 4. Increase heat to medium and add nutritional yeast and bay leaves. Toss for about 5 minutes. 5. Add the squash, beans, and bean cooking liquid into the pot. Cook until the squash is fork tender. The beans will break down during this process, but you can opt to blend about 2 cups of the soup for extra creaminess. (See note below.) 6. Add patola slices and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves when serving. 7. Serve in bowls with miso paste on the side. This soup also freezes well. Note: To use a blender for the hot soup, make sure that the blender lid has vents to let the steam escape. If your blender does not have air vents, just hold a clean dish towel over the blender. DO NOT BLEND WITH AN AIRTIGHT LID. #vegan #whatveganseat #veganfoodshare #vegansofig #plantbased #plantstrong #plantpowered #plantpushers #miso #lifeforcenutrition

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Serves 8 to 10 as side, 4 to 6 as main

Here’s a creamy way to enjoy miso as the weather becomes cooler. This was a hit in our miso making class, and we used an 8-month-old chickpea miso. The miso takes the place of salt in this recipe. If you don’t have miso, just season with salt to taste.
2 c dried white beans, soaked overnight, drained, rinsed, and sprouted over 2 to 3 days
3 medium onions, diced
1/4 c nutritional yeast
3 bay leaves
2 c squash, diced
2 patola, sliced into thin discs
water
salt
neutral oil
miso paste

1. Rinse sprouted beans under running water. Soaking and sprouting cut the bean cooking time by third and boosts the nutritional benefits.
2. In a large lidded pot over medium heat, cook the sprouted beans in water. Make sure the water covers the beans by about an inch or so. Cook the beans until you can easily mash them with a fork. Set aside.
3. In another pot, sweat the onions in oil over low heat for at least 15 minutes, seasoning with a bit of salt.
4. Increase heat to medium and add nutritional yeast and bay leaves. Toss for about 5 minutes.
5. Add the squash, beans, and bean cooking liquid into the pot. Cook until the squash is fork tender. The beans will break down during this process, but you can opt to blend about 2 cups of the soup for extra creaminess. (See note below.)
6. Add patola slices and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves when serving.
7. Serve in bowls with miso paste on the side. This soup also freezes well.
Note: To use a blender for the hot soup, make sure that the blender lid has vents to let the steam escape. If your blender does not have air vents, just hold a clean dish towel over the blender. DO NOT BLEND WITH AN AIRTIGHT LID.

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